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Crondall Primary School

Design and Technology

Design and technology is an inspiring, rigorous and practical subject. Using creativity and imagination, pupils design and make products that solve real and relevant problems within a variety of contexts, considering their own and others’ needs, wants and values. They acquire a broad range of subject knowledge and draw on disciplines such as mathematics, science, engineering, computing, cookery and art. Pupils learn how to take risks, becoming resourceful, innovative, enterprising and capable citizens. Through the evaluation of past and present design and technology, they develop a critical understanding of its impact on daily life and the wider world. High-quality design and technology education makes an essential contribution to the creativity, culture, wealth and well-being of the nation.

By the end of EYFS…

  • Children safely use and explore a variety of materials, tools and techniques, experimenting with colour, design, texture, form and function.
  • Children use what they have learnt about media and materials in original ways, thinking about uses and purposes. They represent their own ideas, thoughts and feelings through design technology.


By the end of KS1….

When designing and making, pupils should be taught to:

Design

  • design purposeful, functional, appealing products for themselves and other users based on design criteria.
  • generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through talking, drawing, templates, mock-ups and, where appropriate, information and communication technology.

Make

  • select from and use a range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing].
  • select from and use a wide range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their characteristics.

Evaluate

  • explore and evaluate a range of existing products.
  • evaluate their ideas and products against design criteria.

Technical knowledge

  • build structures, exploring how they can be made stronger, stiffer and more stable.
  • explore and use mechanisms [for example, levers, sliders, wheels and axles], in their products.

By the end of KS2…

When designing and making, pupils should be taught to:

Design

  • use research and develop design criteria to inform the design of innovative, functional, appealing products that are fit for purpose, aimed at particular individuals or groups.
  • generate, develop, model and communicate their ideas through discussion, annotated sketches, cross-sectional and exploded diagrams, prototypes, pattern pieces and computer-aided design.

Make

  • select from and use a wider range of tools and equipment to perform practical tasks [for example, cutting, shaping, joining and finishing], accurately.
  • select from and use a wider range of materials and components, including construction materials, textiles and ingredients, according to their functional properties and aesthetic qualities.

Evaluate

  • investigate and analyse a range of existing products.
  • evaluate their ideas and products against their own design criteria and consider the views of others to improve their work.
  • understand how key events and individuals in design and technology have helped shape the world.

Technical knowledge

  • apply their understanding of how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce more complex structures.
  • understand and use mechanical systems in their products [for example, gears, pulleys, cams, levers and linkages].
  • understand and use electrical systems in their products [for example, series circuits incorporating switches, bulbs, buzzers and motors].
  • apply their understanding of computing to program, monitor and control their products.

Implementation at our school

At Crondall, Design technology is used creatively from Year R to Year 6 to enhance the termly topics, using the projects on a page provided by Hampshire as a guide. Usually this is blocked into a focussed unit of work so that products are made for a purpose and can be evaluated. We also have a beautiful cookery classroom which is used to fulfil the needs of the curriculum as well as children cooking in here with our catering managers each year, in order to illicit learning around healthy eating, consumer awareness, social meal times and table manners.

 

I love our construction area! ‘ – Year R child

I love DT because it involves getting messy and I like making things!’ – Year 3 child

 ‘I remember in Year 1 we made moon buggies and we learnt all about axels.’ - Year 4 child

 ‘I enjoy doing DT because it is something a bit different and you can use your problem solving skills to create something.’ - Year 5 child

 

How to support my child

Foster the urge to design something.

Use and experiment with a wide variety of materials to understand their properties.

Develop your child’s cutting skills.

Cook with your child regularly.

Allow your child to measure lengths, capacity and weights.